BG to Insulin (Correction) Factor Calculator 1.1.0

BG to Insulin (Correction) Factor Calculator calculates your factor based on adjusted BMI (Body Mass Index) and TDD (Total Daily Dose - combined basal and bolus dose). It is based on inputs such as an individual's weight (kg and lbs), height (cm ...

BG to Insulin (Correction) Factor Calculator 1.1.0

BG to Insulin (Correction) Factor Calculator calculates your factor based on adjusted BMI (Body Mass Index) and TDD (Total Daily Dose - combined basal and bolus dose). It is based on inputs such as an individual's weight (kg and lbs), height (cm and ft/in), age and gender. It first calculates the BMI based on the weight and height, then makes minor statistical adjustments to it for age and gender. After that it calculates the TDD of insulin based on the adjusted BMI. Finally, it calculates the Correction Factor using an optimized œrule determined by statistical data analysis from hundreds of insulin pump users that were able to achieve great BG control. The standard œrules are known as the 1500, 1700, 1800 or 2000 Rule for mg/dl and 90, 100 or 110 Rule for mmol/l.

Glucose levels become elevated when basal delivery is too low to suppress gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, or when carbohydrate boluses are insufficient to adequately cover carbohydrate intake. A Correction Factor measures how far the elevated glucose concentration in an individual will fall per unit of insulin. The correction bolus provides backup for any deficits that occur in basal and carbohydrate bolus delivery. The fall in glucose is inversely related to a person's weight. It is also related to the Insulin Sensitivity which represents the ease with which glucose is transported into insulin sensitive cells. The Correction Factor is inversely related to the TDD. Your Correction Factor is common parameter, used to calculate your daily needs for bolus and basal rates.

BMI (Body Mass Index) Calculation:
The standard BMI is calculated from the weight (in kg) and the height (in m).

BMI Adjustment for Gender:
Statistical research shows that females tend to have an average BMI that is 5 - 10% higher than men. Researchers believe this should not affect the total daily dose of insulin for females and their weight classification bracket should be adjusted to compensate for this minor difference.

BMI Adjustment for Age:
Research shows that individuals with age ranging from 2 to 19 years of age tend to have proportionately lower BMI than individuals 20 or older. Due to this statistical fact, researchers believe this should be taken into consideration when calculating the total daily dose of insulin for young individuals, and their percentile classification bracket should be adjusted to compensate for that difference.

TDD (Total Daily Dose) of Insulin Calculation and Adjustment for BMI:
The TDD calculation is based on an individual™s weight (in kg) multiplied by a factor related to the BMI. There are 4 factors/brackets used: Frail/Thin/Lean (smallest factor), Healthy, Overweight and Obese (largest factor).

Use this calculator only on advice from your physician. Your physician will provide you with the parameter values needed. This method for calculating these parameters is not suitable for everyone.

   



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